Richard Wagamese: Building bridges with literature

Dan Harasymchuk / CC BY-SA

Doloris shared with us “an author who understood the fundamental role that storytelling can play in building bridges of cultural understanding.” It wasn’t until age twenty-three that Mr. Wagamese reconnected with his own Ojibway (Anishinaabe) people. Fortunately, he gives us all an opportunity to understand them so much more, through his writings.

Richard Wagamese was part of Canada’s 60’s SCOOP when it was common practice to ‘scoop’ newborns from mothers on reserves, placing them with mostly middle-class Canadians of European descent. His parents, victims themselves of a residential school system that “tried to scrape the Indian out of their insides,” (Richard Wagamese) had abandoned their children. At three, he was separated from his siblings and sent to various foster homes before being adopted at nine. At sixteen, he was living on the streets, escaping an abusive home life.

Doloris has written about so eloquently about this important and incredible Canadian indigenous writer: PLEASE CONTINUE TO READ HERE

HERE’S A TRIBUTE by Shelagh Rogers to her “Chosen Brother,” which Doloris recommended.