Catherine Gildiner, whose memoirs read like fiction

Photograph: Wikimedia Commons

Cathy Redfern, how we miss your sense of humour! You introduced many of us to the writer Catherine Gildiner in your latest presentation last November. I won’t say “last” because we hope life will bring you back our way!

Catherine Gildiner has written lively, funny, fascinating memoirs (1999, 2010, 2014) — and occasionally pens serious books: Seduction (2005) and her latest Good Morning Monster (2019), both which draw upon her primary profession of clinical psychologist. She is currently working on Underground (working title) about the underground railway to Canada.

Catherine Gildiner has led a most singular life, and Cathy Redfern’s favourite books are the author’s memoirs, especially the first, Too Close to the Falls.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE ON THIS AUTHOR

p.s. If exploring Waterton is in your travel plans, get a copy of Cathy Redfern’s own guide, Knock, Knock Who’s There: A Walking Tour full of Cottage Folklore, Gossip and Tall Tales




Memories of our Spring Luncheon & AGM

While the weather didn’t exactly cooperate, looking rather wintry with clouds, a cool temperature and plenty of snow-covered ground from the previous weekend’s devastating blizzard, inside the elegant surroundings of the Calgary Golf & Country Club was a different story. Spring was all around us thanks to our programs featuring blue hydrangeas complemented by the beautiful floral centerpieces on each table, also featuring blue hydrangeas arranged to perfection by our President Doloris Duval, and even a sprinkling of gorgeous Spring dresses worn by some of our more intrepid members. Any club that can keep meeting throughout two world wars isn’t going to let the weather get the better of it!

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Our season almost over, a new one to begin

The challenge is on for me to find an equivalent sign en français, as I take a sabbatical for a month! I will miss our wonderful Spring Luncheon/AGM! Mostly, I will miss my wonderful friends at CWLC as we all drift about in various directions for the summer.

I’m remiss in keeping up to posting the many funny presentations this year — NOTE: As in hilarious! After I’ve relaxed and rewound, I’ll be a powerhouse! Thanks to all who shared outstanding humour, satire and irony — their own as well as the authors they presented. What an upbeat year! Next year, armchair travels…

Janet H

The New York Times recommends…

… Calgary’s new Central Library, in its popular list called “52 Places to Go This Year.” (Calgary entry by Elaine Glusac)

CLICK HERE to find #20, and then contemplate visiting the 51 other Places recommended!

Calgary Central Library a wonder — and a place to wander!

Living, Loving and Loathing Shakespeare (and Laughing, too!)

Image of William Shakespeare

via Pixabay

Cecilia’s lifelong passion for William Shakespeare was clearly evident in her enthusiastic presentation on October 16, structured in the form of a  five-act Shakespearean play.

Each succeeding act consisted of defined topics, such as family and friends who influenced his writing, his humour as well as various characters who inhabited his plays.

Cecilia’s power point presentation (Act IV) in exquisite pictures, detailed her extensive personal experience with Shakespeare’s live theatre as well as journeys to Stratford in the United Kingdom and Canada.

Shakespeare’s words of wisdom, his philosophy of life and humour still resonate with us today.

FOR MORE, CLICK HERE FOR CECILIA’S PRESENTATION SUMMARY

Sue Carscallen

[NOTE: I have re-posted this, as Cecilia has just published her Presentation Summary, which (like all our presentation summaries) is well worth the read. Janet H.]

Robertson Davies: Humour that’s subtle and intelligent

Sandra Ens has taught Robertson Davies to many English students. Now it’s our turn to find out why! Davies’ style of writing has been out of favour: He uses long sentences and depicts a non-multicultural Canada of times gone by. Yet, his paragraphs, full of literary allusions, can be “unpacked” by an intelligent reader. Is that not us?

Photo of Robertson Davies with quote

Sandra explained that Robertson Davies’ humour is gentle and never malicious. You won’t find many gags. Stories build, characters are well-developed and timing is everything to reveal truth in an unexpected light. Sandra reminded us that truth lies at the heart of comedy, that dying is easy but comedy is hard — and that it takes great skill by an author.

Davies’ comedy is in a SHAKESPEAREAN TRADITION: Satire is to seek improvement and solutions (see also ARISTOPHANES) but delivered through characters that are larger than life, exuberant and expound about life. Laughs will follow!

Sandra’s personal favourite? 5th Business. She also recommends listening to the CBC RADIO INTERVIEW BY ELEANOR WACHTEL

CLICK HERE FOR SANDRA’S SUMMARY and you will be ready to add Robertson Davies to your reading lists!

Aristophanes: Farce & Satire

Masks portraying Greek tragedy/comedy
Buskin & Sock

For her presentation on November 20, Anne Tingle took us back in time to the Golden Age of ancient Greece, and the plays of Aristophanes.

After an engrossing explanation of Aristophanes and his times, Anne surprised many of us with a Reader’s Theatre. Contrary to Greek times, she had assembled an all-female cast (several of our members and a guest) to read parts of Lysistrata, her favourite Aristophanes’ play. Hilarity ensued!

Anne disclosed she was using a turn-of-the-century (i.e. circa 1900) translation for the (relative) comfort of her readers and audience. A 2005 translation was apparently even racier! What a “reveal!” More laughs!

Cultures have changed, but how recognisable are human characteristics, despite a span of 2400+ years!

Aristophanes used satire and farce to highlight the need for peace, order and good government. Although there is no evidence he had influence politically, his artistic influence is incredible, and his plays are still performed.

CLICK HERE for Anne’s Presentation Summary