First Ever Zoom Winter Party and Secret Book Exchange

On November 24, 2020 the club held the annual Winter Party by Zoom. For the first time ever, the party included a secret book exchange. Members gave a book from their shelf anonymously to another member and the gifts and givers were revealed during the Zoom call. This may be the start of a winter tradition.

The books, along with tea and cookies were delivered to member’s houses by couriers from the Executive. Many thanks to President Robin Stanford and all the Executive for making this happen seamlessly. Helen was a wizard at devising the exchange and the courier routes to minimize travel and keep anonymity up.

The Winter Party marks the end of CWLC meetings in 2020. We will resume in the spring of 2021 with the topic “Cultural Awareness/ Writers of Australia and New Zealand”. Greetings and best wishes to all CWLC members, their friends, their families, and other followers of this webpage, as 2020 – a year like no other -draws to a close.

Shawna M.

Birth of the Noir

Photo by Camilla Plener on Unsplash

On November 17, 2020 Anne-Marie Duma presented the two Norwegian authors who are credited with creating the popular Nordic Noir (Scandinavian Noir) genre. Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo created the 10 book “Story of Crime” series in the 1960’s and ’70’s – police procedurals that cast light into the dark side of Norwegian society.

The authors use plain language, a dark landscape, and slow multilayered plots to highlight the poverty, criminality and brutality underneath the welfare state. Anne-Marie read several passages that emphasized the bureaucratic failures, social ills and endemic petty corruption that contribute to crime and hamper police work.

These books are for the reader who likes to solve a puzzle.

Shawna M.

Learn more in Anne-Marie’s summary: https://calgarywomensliteraryclub.com/maj-sjowall-per-wahloo/

Julia Alvarez – Herstory Rather than History

On November 10, 2020 Helen shared her experience of the poetry, fiction and non-fiction of Julia Alvarez, a Dominican American author.  Ms. Alvarez’s work highlights the 20th century immigrant experience from a woman’s point of view. Helen illustrated, through readings from “The Woman I Kept to Myself” – a book of poetry; discussion of Alvarez’s works of auto-fiction; and a video clip from 2020, that Julia Alvarez is not silent in spite of family and societal expectations for women like her.


Photo by JoelValve on Unsplash

Ms. Alvarez’s hero as a young girl was Scheherazade, a woman who used storytelling to defeat a autocrat.  Through her own work, she seeks to bring out truths that expose the ways that society can oppress. Her best known work, “In the Time of the Butterflies” is a fictional account of real sisters who were assassinated for their opposition to the Dominican Trujillo regime. Much of her other work is very personal, discussing her experience as an immigrant and bringing out stories that were not discussed within her family. 

Shawna M.

Learn more by reading Helen’s summary here: https://calgarywomensliteraryclub.com/julia-alvarez/

Laurens van der Post -Adventurer and Writer

Photo by Chris Stenger on Unsplash

Janet Samber presented South African Afrikaaner author Laurens van der Post whose many works of fiction and non-fiction alike reflect his real-life experiences as a farmer, journalist, soldier, prisoner of war, and student of Carl Jung.  Using photographs from her own travels to southern Africa, Janet introduced members to the fascinating world of the Kalahari Bushmen, the indigenous people of that part of the continent. The Bushmen were of passionate interest and concern to van der Post who, in writing The Lost World of the Kalahari, sought to raise awareness about these original hunter-gatherers and the genocide threatening their existence.  In so doing, he reminds us all of our common humanity.

H. Tubrett

See Janet’s presentation summary here https://calgarywomensliteraryclub.com/laurens-van-der-post/

Khaled Hosseini – The Refugee Experience

Photo by Umut YILMAN on Unsplash

On October 27 2020, member Elaine Buckman gave a presentation on the works of modern Afghan-American author Khaled Hosseini.

For Elaine, Mr. Hosseini makes the refugee immigrant experience personal in his two novels. The ancient and recent history of Afghanistan is one of resistance to foreign conquest. Culturally, Afghanistan has conservative tribal and class distinctions that are a contrast with the values of Western society.

Mr. Hosseini’s father was a diplomat, who emigrated to the United States after the Russian invasion of Afghanistan. His family settled into an immigrant community and Mr. Hosseini became a doctor and married a law student who was also in the Afghan immigrant community.

While working as a doctor, Mr. Hosseini wrote his first novel “The Kite Runner”. It is a tale of both Afghanistan and immigrants who have left Afghanistan. The characters struggle to meet traditional family expectations while respecting individual rights in a modern social setting. The novel was met with widespread commercial success and has been made into a movie and a play.

A second novel  “A Thousand Splendid Suns”; a book of short stories “ And Now the Mountains Echo; and a poem “ Sea Prayer” have followed “The Kite Runner”. These works continue the themes of the immigrant experience, grief, class & poverty, and the status of women in Afghan society.

S.Mattison

SEE ELAINE’S SUMMARY HERE https://calgarywomensliteraryclub.com/khaled-hosseini-1965/

Alan Paton – Agape love

File:Alan Paton.jpg
South African Author Alan Paton. Image: Wikimedia.

Denise Doz chose this South African author for his masterful and influential use of literature to plea for compassionate love, or agapé, for those suffering under South Africa’s apartheid system. She noted that institutionalized apartheid has regrettably been replaced with something new in South Africa, and racism isn’t restricted to that country. Shamefully, Apartheid was informed by Canada’s Indian Act. His books remain relevant today with the Black Lives Matter movement in the USA and across the world in our current news cycle.

“(Agapé) embraces a universal, unconditional love that transcends and persists regardless of circumstance.” (Wikipedia)

Alan Paton wrote from the soul, and with faith that his own society could change through non-violence. He wanted to motivate readers to compassion and change. Cry, the Beloved Country, his first novel, dug deep to expose the implications of apartheid on individuals, family and society. It was groundbreaking, bringing the faces of apartheid to readers worldwide. Paton became a prolific author thereafter.

Denise’s first reading was of his description of his birthplace, Durban, demonstrating his exquisite “wordscapes” that incorporate all senses. She ended her presentation with a video clip: We saw a rugby stadium and the singing of the new South African anthem in Zulu, Afrikaans and English in the post-apartheid “Rainbow Nation.” Transformation is happening.

In-between, Denise shared so much more.

FIND DENISE’S PRESENTATION SUMMARY HERE

J. Halls & S. Mattison

Remembering Lillian Tickles

In great sadness, we inform you of the passing of CWLC member and former President Lillian Tickles on May 15, 2019.

2016 Lillian cutting cake
Lillian Tickles cutting the cake, CWLC 110 year anniversary party 2016.

Lillian was President of our Club for two seasons, spanning 2014-2016. That means she was Vice-President from 2012-2014 and Past President 2016-2018!­­ These are not just titles, but tremendous hands-on involvement for at least six years. She divulged in her Annual Report 2014-15, “When I reflect on year one of my biennium as president, a montage of images tells the story of the unfolding experience. Some of the early scenes in the composition depict Lillian, nervously taking over the role so competently managed by Ruth Hilland. In her words, I had inherited “a book club with a difference.” How to maintain, or indeed enhance this reputation became the challenge.” Lillian indeed enhanced the Club, providing a warm welcome to everyone. We will miss her!

Ruth Hilland says of Lillian’s stewardship of CWLC: “…she set the bar much higher and the club flourished.”

” When I took over from her as President, she was a terrific mentor. She had endless patience and I could always rely on her for sound advice.  Lillian was a very kind person and she always had the best interests of the club in mind. The CWLC has lost a wonderful friend and advocate.” Margaret Sparkes, Past President.

“Loved and respected by many, Lillian was a strong, independent woman with a voice to be heard, clever, purposeful,  yet collaborative and always caring for the needs of others.

She found the perfect venue for her love of literature in the Calgary Women’s Literary Club serving as President in 2014-16 and cut the cake for the club’s 110thbirthday in February 2016. A one hundred and ten year old club needs a few nips and tucks but Lillian initiated the big sweep, cleaning up and bringing the constitution into the 21 century.  She was invaluable in sharing her knowledge and insight.  An admired and respected member of the Calgary Women’s Literary Club.” Long-time member, friend and colleague Anita Madill.

Her obituary can be found at: https://calgaryherald.remembering.ca/obituary/lillian-tickles-1074725478